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American Journal of Environmental Biology take pride in the quality of the peer reviewed journal it publishes. We publish novel and advanced original research articles on topics related to the knowledge of environmental biology that includes but not limited to: Environmental Science, Ecology and Ecosystems, Pollution, Toxicology, Bioremediation and Biosorption, Earth Science and Evolutionary Process, Environmental Biotechnology, Environmental Health, Waste Management, Environment Management and Impact Assessment, Environmental Sustainability, Population and conservation Biology, Environment and forests, Environment and Agriculture. Our journal is published through the open access AB-Blue model. Here authors as well as the readers do not have bear any fee or cost. Also the articles are instantly made available to general public upon the acceptance through a peer-review channel. Presented in the side panel is the cover page of our current issue.

CURRENT ISSUE

Authors: Vikrant Tiwari* and Nimisha Sharma
Available online: June 21, 2020

Abstract: In the absence of the detailed COVID-19 epidemiological data or large benchmark studies, an effort has been made to explore and correlate the relation of parameters like environment, economic indicators, and the large scale exposure of different prevalent diseases, with COVID-19 spread and severity amongst the different countries affected by COVID-19. Data for environmental, socio-economic and others important infectious diseases were collected from reliable and open source resources like World Health Organization, World Bank, etc. Further, this large data set is utilized to understand the COVID-19 worldwide spread using simple statistical tools. Important observations that are made in this study are the high degree of resemblance in the pattern of temperature and humidity distribution among the cities severely affected by COVID-19. Further, It is surprising to see that in spite of the presence of many environmental parameters that are considered favorable (like clean air, clean water, EPI, etc.), many countries are suffering with the severe consequences of this disease. Lastly a noticeable segregation among the locations affected by different prevalent diseases (like Malaria, HIV, Tuberculosis, and Cholera) was also observed. Among the considered environmental factors, temperature, humidity and EPI should be an important parameter in understanding and modelling COVID-19 spreads. Further, contrary to intuition, countries with strong economies, good health infrastructure and cleaner environment suffered disproportionately higher with the severity of this disease. Therefore, policymaker should sincerely review their country preparedness toward the potential future contagious diseases, weather natural or manmade.

KEYWORDS: COVID19, Environmental factors, EPI, Epidemiology, Humidity, Pandemic, Respiratory droplets, Temperature, SARS-COV-2.

Competing interests: The authors declare no competing interests.

Publisher’s note: This journal (AJEB) and its publishers remains neutral with regard to any claims in published maps, institutional affiliations, opinion's or otherwise. Information presented in this article is the sole responsibility of its authors.

Authors: Neetu Tewari* and P. Vasudevan
Available online: April 29, 2020

Abstract: Untreated effluents when discharged into the environment possess potential health hazards to almost all forms of life. Many plants are being used to study the toxic effects of heavy metal pollution on plants. However, aquatic plants like Lemna minor are widely used. Their wide distribution, small size, ease of culture and rapid reproduction rates are the attributes that have led to their use as a cost-effective test model. In the present study batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of Cr (VI) and Cr (III) on biochemical content of Lemna minor. Ecotoxic effect of Cr (VI) and Cr (III) on growth, amount of total chlorophyll, total soluble starch, total free sugar, total soluble proteins and total free amino acids was studied in the present research. It was found that Cr (III) at all the concentrations did not affect any of the study parameters significantly. However, Cr (VI) at and beyond 10 mg/l significantly affected the studied parameters. Bioaccumulation of Cr (VI) and Cr (III) by Lemna minor was also investigated. Substantial Cr (VI) accumulation was detected in Lemna minor while it accumulates very low amounts of Cr (III). Aquatic plant-like Lemna bioaccumulate high amounts of Cr (VI) thus it may help in the treatment of polluted water bodies.

KEYWORDS: Bioaccumulation, Chromium, Duckweed, Ecotoxicity, Lemna.

Competing interests: The authors declare no competing interests.

Publisher’s note: This journal (AJEB) and its publishers remains neutral with regard to any claims in published maps, institutional affiliations, opinion's or otherwise. Information presented in this article is the sole responsibility of its authors.

Authors: Geetanjali* and Ram Singh
Available online: April 16, 2020

Abstract: Heavy metals, when exceeds the permissible limits, regarded as environmental pollutants. The agricultural fields, along with countryside areas are the most affected areas due to heavy metal contaminants affecting the crop yields. When these heavy metals find their way into the food chain possess a serious threat to plant and animal health. The industrial discharge, mining waste, chemical fertilizer industries are some of the main sources of heavy metal accumulation. The removal or reduction of these heavy metals from the agricultural fields are the unceasing requirements. One of the important and easy methods is removal or reduction with the help of plants which is known as phytoremediation, and it takes advantage of the remarkable ability of plants to concentrate elements and compound from the environment. This technology is immerging as a cost-effective way to address high cost involved in pollution abatement technologies. Toxic heavy metals and organic pollutants are the major targets for phytoremediation. This review article discusses the state of phytoremediation technology for the removal of heavy metals mainly from the soil.

KEYWORDS: Agricultural Land, Heavy Metals, Metal Contaminants, Phytoremediation.

Competing interests: The authors declare no competing interests.

Publisher’s note: This journal (AJEB) and its publishers remains neutral with regard to any claims in published maps, institutional affiliations, opinion's or otherwise. Information presented in this article is the sole responsibility of its authors.

Authors: Neetu Tewari* and P. Vasudevan
Available online: 4 April 2020

Abstract: The adsorption of Hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI)] from aqueous solution by raw baggase was studied as a function of initial pH, contact time, dose, concentration and temperature. The optimum initial pH for Cr (VI) uptake was 2.0. At the optimal conditions, Cr (VI) uptake was increased as the dose of adsorbent; the initial metal ion concentration and temperature were increased. Adsorption was fast initially and within the first 30 minutes of contact, the adsorption of Cr (VI) on baggase showed a total uptake of 84.4%. The adsorption data fitted well to Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum adsorption of baggase was found to be 9.4 mg/g. The kinetics of the adsorption was found to be pseudo-second-order. Thermodynamic parameters like activation energy, Gibbs free energy change, enthalpy and entropy were also evaluated. The values for activation energy and enthalpy were found to be 13.4 and 10.7 kJ/mol. Adsorption was found to be endothermic.

KEYWORDS: Adsorption, Bagasse, Chromium, Equilibrium, Kinetics, Thermodynamics.

Competing interests: The authors declare no competing interests.

Publisher’s note: This journal (AJEB) and its publishers remains neutral with regard to any claims in published maps, institutional affiliations, opinion's or otherwise. Information presented in this article is the sole responsibility of its authors.

Authors: Richa Srivastava* and Ram Singh
Available online: 25 March 2020

Abstract: The petrochemical-based plastics are causing a strong challenge for the natural ecosystem leading to global environmental pollution due to their non-biodegradable nature. Hence, the requirement of alternative materials possessing environmental advantages received attention and leads to the development of bioplastics. Definition of bioplastics is not universal but broadly it can be defined as biodegradable plastic derived from biodegradable substances. Although, all types of bioplastics are not biodegradable, still their many advantages towards the environment cannot be ruled out and hence, their applications in varied areas have increased many-folds world-wide. Bioplastics are being used in rigid and flexible packaging materials, food and drinks containers, dining utensils, electronic devices, automotive and airplane parts, cable sheaths and casings, noise and thermal insulation panels and many more. The list is growing up. Bioplastics have shown their potential for a sustainable society and presents some advantages such as lower carbon footprint, energy efficiency, and eco-safety. This article discusses the basic information, sources, biodegradability, and applications of bioplastics.

KEYWORDS: Bioplastics, Biodegradation, Biomass, Plastics, Sustainability.

Competing interests: The authors declare no competing interests.

Publisher’s note: This journal (AJEB) and its publishers remains neutral with regard to any claims in published maps, institutional affiliations, opinion's or otherwise. Information presented in this article is the sole responsibility of its authors.